Senator John Heinz

RELATED NEWS

  • James Balog awarded Duke University LEAF Award for fine arts contributions in the environment go >>
  • John Luther Adams is the 2014 recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for Music go >>
  • Richard Jackson pens article on healthy communities for the Idaho Statesman go >>
  • Dan Simpson, columnist at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, writes Op-Ed on this year's Heinz Awards go >>
  • Salman Khan is named a Presidential Ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship go >>
  • Peter Matthiessen, renowned writer and naturalist, and 6th Heinz Award recipient for Arts and Humanities, dies at 86 go >>
  • Peter Matthiessen's extraordinary life is profiled in The New York Times Magazine go >>
  • Hugh Herr gives his 2014 TED talk including a dance finale by a survivor who lost her lower leg in the Boston Marathon bombing go >>
  • Ann Hamilton commisioned to create large-scale public art installation for Seattle’s new waterfront reconstruction project go >>
  • Leila Janah's SamaUSA is profiled at NationSwell.com go >>
  • Paul Famer interviewed by Ray Chambers at The Huffington Post about ending tuberculosis go >>
  • Hugh Herr and his lab help Boston Marathon victim to dance again at TED go >>
  • The new documentary about Cary Fowler's work, Seeds of Time, is profiled at Grist.org go >>
  • Mario Molina and other AAAS scientists sound the alarm on climate change go >>
  • William Thomas is interviewed by Next Avenue on his new book on aging: Second Wind go >>
  • Abraham Verghese interviewed by the El Paso's News Paper Tree go >>
  • Leila Janah profiled in the March issue of Chronicle of Philanthropy go >>
  • Jacques d'Amboise lends his expertise and teaching methods to ten educators from across the country go >>
  • Khan Academy to gain exclusive partnership with College Board to offer free test prep courses go >>
  • Seeds of Time, a documentary that follows Cary Fowler as he works to stock the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, debuts at SXSW go >>
  • Jonathan Foley and his work is profiled at MinnPost.com go >>
  • Millie Dresselhaus is one of two Heinz Awardees in 2014 class inducted into National Inventors Hall of Fame go >>
  • Ashok Gadgil is one of two Heinz Awardees in 2014 class inducted into National Inventors Hall of Fame go >>
  • Leroy Hood's Institute for Systems Biology to test P4 ideas with nine-month pilot study, the Hundred Person Wellness Project go >>
  • After 23 years Geoffrey Canada will step down as chief executive of the Harlem Children's Zone go >>
  • Al Gore reviews Elizabeth Kolbert's book, The Sixth Extinction, for The New York Times Sunday Book Review go >>
  • Janine Benyus talks with Tim Brown of IDEO as part of a new TED editorial series, â??Questions Worth Askingâ?? go >>
  • Paul Ehrlich to receive the 2014 Frontiers of Knowledge Award for Ecology and Conservation Biology from the BBVA Foundation go >>
  • Elizabeth Kolbert's newest book, The Sixth Extinction, is reviewed by The New York Times go >>
  • Mason Bates co-curates Chicago Symphony Orchestra's reimagined MusicNOW series go >>
  • Dee Boersma's work on Magellanic penguins is profiled on NPR go >>
  • Dee Boersma's 28 year study on the direct impact of climate change on Magellanic penguins is profiled in The New York Times go >>
  • The New York Times reviews "Jacques' Art Nest," a benefit performance for Jacques d'Amboise's National Dance Institute go >>
  • Christopher Field is the 2013 recipient of the 400,000 euro BBVA Frontiers of Knowledge Award in climate change go >>
  • Elizabeth Kolbert interviewed at newyorker.com on her writing on species extinction go >>
  • Freeman Hrabowski writes Op-Ed for The Baltimore Sun go >>
  • Hugh Herr's BiOM prosthetic and upcoming research is profiled in Boston magazine go >>
  • Robert Langer is one of six recipients of the 2013 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences go >>
  • Freeman Hrabowski is interviewed in The New York Times go >>
  • Millie Dresselhaus receives the 2013 Von Hippel Award from the Materials Research Society go >>
  • Richard Lugar receives the Presidential Medal of Freedom go >>
  • Hugh Herr is profiled in Men's Fitness magazine go >>
  • Paul Farmer and Melinda Gates are interviewed for Wired magazine go >>
  • Christopher Field to receive the 2013 Max Planck Research Prize go >>
  • Herbert Needleman's work to protect children from lead poisoning is profiled by Gerald Markowitz and David Rosner go >>
  • Aaron T. Beck receives the first ever Kennedy Community Mental Health Award go >>
  • Amory Lovins writes a piece on what the 1973 oil embargo can teach us today go >>
  • Jane Lubchenco co-authors piece calling on policymakers to plan for climate change go >>
  • Jane Lubchenco shares the 2013 Stroud Award for Freshwater Excellence go >>
  • George Hatsopoulos (with brother John) is profiled in The Boston Globe as an example of how age has little to do with entrepreneurship go >>
  • Marian Wright Edelman and Children's Defense Fund celebrate 40th anniversary go >>
  • Peter Matthiessen to put out a new novel, "In Paradise" go >>
  • Ruth Patrick, a pioneer in studying the health of freshwater rivers and streams, has died at the age of 105 go >>
  • Joseph Rogers to receive lifetime achievement award from the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration go >>
  • Ralph Cavanagh writes OpEd piece for The New York Times on energy consumption go >>
  • Nancy Rabalais and the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium profiled in The Scientist go >>
  • Karin Chenowith reflects on Freeman Hrabowski's early involvement in the civil rights movement go >>
  • James Goodby co-authors piece on recent agreement between North and South Korea go >>
  • Richard Jackson is elected to honorary membership in The American Institute of Architects go >>
  • Robert Moses featured on NPR's Morning Edition go >>
  • Terry Collins' TAML activators are one step closer to commercial use go >>
  • John Harbison’s "Gatsby" performed at Tanglewood in honor of his 75th birthday go >>
  • Hugh Herr is profiled in The Wall Street Journal's Weekend Interview go >>
  • Ralph Gomory writes On Manufacturing and Innovation for The Huffington Post go >>
  • Chris Field to share the Max Planck Research Prize for his research on climate change on ecosystems go >>
  • Boston Symphony Orchestra honors John Harbison with Mark M. Horblit "Merit Award" go >>
  • Jay Keasling's work on biofuels profiled on NPR's Morning Edition go >>
  • Ralph Gomory pens editorial in The Washington Post on the role of human nature in business go >>
  • Daniel Sperling receives the 2013 Blue Planet prize from the Asahi Glass Foundation go >>
  • Steve Wozniak interviewed in Ireland's Silicon Republic about innovation, the technology economy and Apple go >>
  • Leroy Hood guest blogs at The Wall Street Journal on what "Nonprofits Can Learn from Startups" go >>
  • Mary Good to head new center focused on data visualization at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock go >>
  • Janine Benyus to share the 2013 Gothenburg Award for Sustainable Development go >>
  • Mark di Suvero awarded gold medal for the arts by American Academy of Arts and Letters go >>
  • Mary Good and her career in chemistry is profiled in a short film by the Chemical Heritage Foundation go >>
  • Jay Keasling to receive 2013 George Washington Carver Award for innovation in industrial biotechnology go >>
  • Jay Keasling and his current work on artemisinin profiled in San Francisco Business Times go >>
  • Joint BioEnergy Institute, headed by Jay Keasling, to be renewed until 2018 go >>
  • The Nuclear Threat Initiative, with Sam Nunn and Richard Lugar, proposes new strategy to reduce conflict and to encourage security go >>
  • Robert Langer pens a piece for Project Syndicate on Going Against Conventional Wisdom go >>
  • Robert Langer is interviewed on NPR's Science Friday go >>
  • C. Everett Koop, former surgeon general, has died at age 96 go >>
  • Marian Wright Edelman to receive Harvard Graduate School of Education's Medal for Education Impact go >>
  • Susan Seacrest is profiled by the Lincoln Star Journal go >>
  • Jay Keasling's semi-synthetic anti-malarial artemisinin now being produced in bulk and ready for introduction go >>
  • Hugh Herr speaks on cutting edge bionics at the Digital-Life-Design Conference go >>
  • Jay Keasling is profiled on CNN's The Next List go >>
  • Jane Lubchenco is the 2012 recipient of the 400,000 euro BBVA Frontiers of Knowledge Award in ecology and conservation biology go >>
  • Sidney Drell receives the National Medal of Science go >>
  • Philosopher Anthony Grayling interviews Robert Langer on the BBC's "Exchanges on the Frontier" go >>

The Heinz Awards

2004

Julius Richmond

Julius B. Richmond receives the Heinz Award for Public Policy for pioneering a revolution that helped transform Americans' attitudes toward their own health and improve the collective quality of life across generations.

A pediatrician and child development researcher, Dr. Richmond is professor of Health Policy, emeritus, at Harvard University. His leadership within government and academia has helped empower millions of Americans to take responsibility for their own well-being, and as a consequence, has helped reduce the nation's mortality rates, particularly among children.

Dr. Richmond was one of the original founders and the first director of Head Start, the federally backed effort to improve the early development of poor and at-risk children through comprehensive child care services. During the 1960s, he also organized and directed the Community Health Centers program as part of the federal anti-poverty program.

In 1977, President Carter appointed him to serve as the U.S. surgeon general and assistant secretary for health in the U.S. Department of Health, Education and Welfare. Two years later, he issued a seminal report, Healthy People: The Surgeon General's Report on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention. He leveraged the report to create greater awareness about the role of health promotion and disease prevention - rather than focusing on the treatment of disease. The report challenged the country to meet 226 goals over the next decade to make people healthier, reduce deaths by 20-35 percent and lower sick days by 20 percent for the elderly. By 1987, the ambitious goal had been fully achieved for children between one and 14, with the rest of the age groups achieving an 80 percent success rate. Dr. Richmond's original objectives since have been updated by two administrations.

In 1979, Dr. Richmond tackled another pervasive public health issue - cigarette smoking. His report, Smoking and Health, documented the harmful effects of cigarettes and cautioned that smoking was the "single, most preventable killer in America." The report went well beyond the government's 1964 report on smoking. It offered particularly sobering warnings to women, leading to a change in cigarette warning labels to include the risks of smoking during pregnancy.

The following year, Dr. Richmond focused the public spotlight on prenatal and pediatric health care. He organized the "Workshop on Maternal and Infant Health," calling together a panel of 75 experts to help develop a national strategy for combating infant mortality and eliminating the disparities in health status, particularly between blacks and whites.

Dr. Richmond has served as the director of Harvard University's Division of Health Policy Research and Education, a joint venture of the schools of medicine, public health and government. He has also served as the director of the Judge Baker Children's Center, a program dedicated to the healthy development of children through research and education. He co-chaired the Carnegie Task Force on Meeting the Needs of Young Children, which has called for expanding social programs such as Head Start and the Special Supplemental Food Program for Women, Infants and Children to better meet the needs of children living in poor environments.

Dr. Richmond's energetic and steadfast leadership for more than 50 years has produced profound results. He has brought to the process a level of insight, involvement and enthusiasm that has been truly remarkable. One of this nation's true giants in the area of public health policy, Dr. Richmond's life's work leaves as its legacy a healthier America - especially its poorest young children.

Note: This profile is excerpted from the commemorative brochure published at the time of the awards' presentation.


REMEMBERING

Julius Richmond passed away on July 27, 2008.


UPDATES SINCE RECEIVING THE HEINZ AWARD

September 2006 - Harvard creates Center on the Developing Child to honor the lifelong work of Julius Richmond. - Harvard University Gazette

January 2006 - Richmond receives the Public Advocacy Award from the Friends of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research. The award went to Richmond for his lifetime contributions to public health service and education which have "lessened health disparities for disadvantaged groups, provided extensive media information about the state of public health, and helped convince Americans that cigarette smoking was a major contributor to preventable disease." - Friends of the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research

July 2005 - Richmond co-authors the book The Health Care Mess: How We Got Into It and What It Will Take to Get Out with Rashi Fein. The book analyzes the current "quest for profits" state of the health care industry in the United States, and offers the idea of government sponsored health insurance for everyone as a possible solution. - Publishers Weekly Review

April 2005 - Richmond signs on as part of a new group whose purpose is "to promote expanded trade with Cuba." The new U.S.-Cuba Trade Association's first agenda is to defend and strengthen trade interactions that concern agricultural and medical products, which the group sees as vital to both nations, and then to work toward restoring normal trade relations between the United States and Cuba on a more general level. - National Journal's Congress Daily

February 2004 - Richmond is one of four former surgeon generals to unveil a new national plan to curb smoking. The plan calls for a tax of $2 on every pack of cigarettes, a burden that is predicted to encourage at least five million Americans to quit smoking. - The Associated Press

Speech

12/4/2003 - Acceptance Speech

It was a privilege for me to have served in Washington at the same time as Senator Heinz. He exemplified the best in our democratic tradition; he worked to improve the lot of all people in a non-partisan way. He was our social conscience and it is indeed an honor to be recognized by the Foundation, which bears his family's name.

I have had the good fortune to live for almost a century. Therefore my observations on the health, education and welfare of our children are from the perspective of a century. What is our record? Is the glass half-full or half-empty?

If we look at our progress in reducing morbidity and mortality the glass is half full. We have dramatically reduced infant mortality - although we could do better. We have virtually eliminated the acute infectious diseases of childhood. During my pediatric training I spent half my time taking care of children with diphtheria, whooping cough, scarlet fever, measles, mumps, rubella and polio, which medical students educated in the U.S. will never see! And we eradicated smallpox from the world! These are dramatic examples of the applications of biomedical research to public health through the development of sound public policies.

But in the development of programs for children growing up in environments of poverty, the glass is half-empty. Please let me become more personal.

Thirty-eight years ago, in 1965, we were in the midst of a civil rights revolution that resulted in the anti-poverty program. I was asked to come to Washington to develop a bold new comprehensive child development program that we called Head Start. Within six months we enrolled 500,000 children in 2700 communities. Most importantly we took seriously the mandate of the legislation for the program: "maximum feasible participation of the poor." We empowered people in their communities. Those were days when we had the political will to do bold things.

But unfortunately the political will waned. Today only 60% of eligible children are enrolled. And the cynics keep raising questions about whether the program works. Leaving aside all the research which shows that it does, who should apologize for feeding hungry children or providing them with medical care; or helping them to develop sound habits of learning.

Even more significantly, the gap between rich and poor children has grown larger. Children growing up in urban and in rural poverty still need Head Start. We know how to raise children well and how to educate them. But we lost the political will. It is time to regenerate it in the spirit and in the memory of Senator Heinz.
Julius Richmond
Julius Richmond