Senator John Heinz

RELATED NEWS

  • James Nachtwey receives the Princess of Asturias Award for Communication and Humanities go >>
  • Mark di Suvero is profiled in The Paris Review go >>
  • Marian Wright Edelman discusses the importance of libraries for children and families go >>
  • Sangeeta Bhatia at TED Talks Live discusses her work on early cancer detection using nanotech go >>
  • Dr. Sanjeev Arora to receive the University of New Mexico's Presidential Award of Distinction for his work on Project ECHO go >>
  • The Washington Post reviews Rita Dove's new book of Collected Poems, 1974-2004 go >>
  • Paul Anastas receives the 2016 Green Chemistry Award from the Royal Society of Chemistry go >>
  • Robert Langer's lab develops a gel-based 'second skin' to smooth wrinkled skin go >>
  • Mason Bates is profiled by KQED in San Francisco go >>
  • Robert Langer receives 2016 Benjamin Franklin Medal Institute in Life Science from the Franklin Institute go >>
  • Sangeeta Bhatia is interviewed by CCTV America at the Clinton Global Initiative go >>
  • Dean Kamen is profiled in the Wall Street Journal go >>
  • Mason Bates is profiled by Anne Midgette of The Washinton Post go >>
  • John Luther Adams profiled as the composer-in-residence at the 2016 Big Ears Festival go >>
  • Andrew Grove, 1st Heinz Award recipient for Technology and the Economy, dies at 79 go >>
  • Frederica Perera is co-author of study on dangers of prenatal pollution exposure go >>
  • Steve Wozniak is profiled on the Reddit and Google Cloud Platform "Formative Moment" series go >>
  • Sanjeev Arora and Project ECHO are part of Fast Company article on social media, medical care and the developing world go >>
  • Leroy Hood's Institute for Systems Biology to join with Providence Health and Science go >>
  • Robert Langer surveys the diverse output from his MIT research lab go >>
  • Marian Wright Edelman to receive the Thomas Jefferson Foundation Medal go >>
  • James Hansen co-authors paper about future of rising heat in tropics and Middle East go >>
  • Rick Lowe is profiled in the Stanford Arts Review go >>
  • Sangeeta Bhatia and her work are profiled in MIT Technology Review go >>
  • Sal Khan talks about his early history on the Reddit and Google Cloud Platform "Formative Moment" series go >>
  • Jake Wood, of Team Rubicon, is named to The Chronicle of Philanthropy's 2016 40 Under 40 list go >>
  • Elizabeth Kolbert writes about rising sea levels and South Florida for The New Yorker go >>
  • Dan Rather interviews Chris Field about climate change go >>
  • Salman Khan is interviewed by Here and Now on WBUR go >>
  • Donald Berwick to join the Health Policy Commission in Massachusetts go >>
  • Richard Alley is part of panel on The Dane Rehm Show discussing the melting ice sheets go >>
  • Aaron Wolf wins American Association of Geographers Gilbert White Public Service Award go >>
  • Salman Khan teams up with Tata Trusts to offer free online education to students in India in local languages go >>
  • Jonathan Foley writes a piece on Medium, "Sometimes, A Whale Dies" go >>
  • Jake Wood, of Team Rubicon, is a guest on The Late Show with Stephen Colbert go >>
  • Marian Wright Edelman co-recipient of the Patino Moore Legacy Award from the Marguerite Casey Foundation go >>
  • DOC NYC Film Festival premieres Ian Cheney's new film: Bluespace go >>
  • Sanjeev Arora announces major expansion of Project ECHO with the American Academy of Pediatrics go >>
  • Janine Benyus to join U.S. Green Building Council board of directors in 2016 go >>
  • Bruce Katz is named as Brookings Institution's inaugural Centennial Scholar, studying the innovations and impacts of global urbaniation go >>
  • Jonathan Foley writes on why museums can help change the world go >>
  • Mason Bates inaugural Kennedy Center Jukebox is reviewed by The Washington Post go >>
  • Janine Benyus is interviewed by The Dirt (American Society of Landscape Architects) go >>
  • Hugh Herr and his vision of bionics for the future profiled in the November issue of Popular Science go >>
  • John Luther Adams named artist-in-residence for 2016 Knoxville Big Ears music festival go >>
  • Leila Janah featured as one of five technology visionaries in The New York Times 'T' magazine go >>
  • Janine Benyus speaks in October at SXSW Eco 2015 bringing together the natural and manmade worlds go >>
  • Jay Keasling is co-recipient of $1 million Samson Prime Minister's Prize for Innovation in Alternative Fuels go >>
  • Curt Ellis writes OpEd for CNBC on how funding a "School lunch program could save $103 billion" go >>
  • TIME publishes a photo series by James Nachtwey on the refugee crisis go >>
  • Janine Benyus to recieve the Edward O. Wilson Biodiversity Technology Pioneer Award from Montanta State University go >>
  • Rita Dove to give the Poetry Society's Annual Lecture in October in the UK go >>
  • Arthur Mitchell receives Roosevelt Institute Freedom of Speech and Expression Award go >>
  • The Boston Globe reviews James Nachtwey's photography exhibit at The Currier Museum go >>
  • Paul Farmer launches the University of Global Health Equity in Rwanda go >>
  • James Balog captures images of California wildfires for The New York Times Magazine go >>
  • Denzel Washington to bring all 10 plays by August Wilson to HBO go >>
  • In "Biomimicry," a short film by Leila Conners, Janine Benyus presents the broad vision of the principles of biomimicry go >>
  • Ann Hamilton will receive the 2014 National Medal of Arts go >>
  • Richard Jackson pens OpEd piece for Corpus Christi Caller Times go >>
  • Living On Earth interviews Beverly Wright on racism and post-Katrina New Orleans go >>
  • Marian Wright Edelman calls for diversity in children's books go >>
  • Elizabeth Kolbert profiles Christiana Figueres, who oversees the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change go >>
  • Roz Chast talks about her art and the exhibit on her work at the Norman Rockwell Museum go >>
  • Richard Feely is profiled on The Washington Post's The Fed Page go >>
  • Louis Guillette, a pioneer in the field of endocrine disruption, dies at 60 go >>
  • Frederica Perera's NYC study links prenatal exposure to airborne toxins to damage to brain development go >>
  • Brenda Krause Eheart's multi-generational community, Hope Meadows, is profiled by NPR go >>
  • Sal Khan is interviewed for Bloomberg on the "Future of Education" go >>
  • Gretchen Daily is interviewed by WNYC on the possible impact on mental health from walking in nature go >>
  • Leila Janah and Samasource profiled for Wired go >>
  • Christopher Field awarded the 2015 Stephen H. Schneider Award for Outstanding Climate Science Communication go >>
  • Janine Benyus is interviewed by Wired about sustainable manufacturing and technology go >>
  • The Boston Globe profiles John Luther Adams, whose work is being performed at Tanglewood go >>
  • The Carbon Brief offers an in-depth interview with Chris Field go >>
  • Geoffrey Canada writes an OpEd for the New York Daily News about the importance of education and economic opportunities go >>
  • John Luther Adams debuts Across The Distance, a new outdoor piece featuring up to 64 French horns go >>
  • Leila Janah writes on "effective altruism" for the Boston Review go >>
  • Kirk Smith is honored with 2014 Haagen-Smit Clean Air Award go >>
  • Fast Company writes about Dave Eggers' 4-year old ScholarMatch, helping low-income students through their writing go >>
  • Roz Chast explores Italian Renaissance painting for the Met's Artist Project go >>
  • Abraham Verghese gives a talk at TEDx Stanford go >>
  • Sangeeta Bhatia talks to SciAm's 60-Second Science about bacteria diagnosing tumors go >>
  • Elizabeth Kolbert reflects on the Pope's climate-change encyclical go >>
  • John Luther Adams writes in The New Yorker about moving from his longtime home in Alaska go >>
  • Gretchen Daily interviewed on The Huffington Post about putting a price on nature go >>
  • Salon.com interviews Dave Eggers and Mimi Lok about "Voice of Witness Reader," their decade-old oral history series go >>
  • Nancy Knowlton pens article on why she "is an ocean optimist" go >>
  • Sanjeev Arora's Project ECHO launches a Geriatric Mental Health project in New York State go >>
  • Documentary on Cary Fowler and his seed archive is reviewed on NPR go >>

The Heinz Awards

2001

James Hansen

Dr. James Hansen receives the Heinz Award in the Environment for his exemplary leadership in the critical and often contentious debate over the threat of global climate change.

The theory that industrial pollution continues to create an atmospheric "greenhouse effect" or warming has pitted scientist against scientist and politician against politician. In the eye of the storm that swirls around this issue is Dr. Hansen. He calmly pursues his research while scrupulously maintaining his scientific credibility and modifying his views as new data and techniques have become available, all the while acting as a messenger from the esoteric world of computer climate models to the public and policymakers alike.

It was Dr. Hansen who, in the sweltering, drought-scorched summer of 1988, went where few scientists were willing to go - before Congress, to explain just how serious the potential for global warming truly was. Dr. Hansen courageously testified that the time had come to recognize that the "greenhouse effect" was real and that new and cleaner sources of energy had to be found. Time has validated his position.

The director of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Goddard Institute for Space Studies in New York, Dr. Hansen has collected and analyzed global surface temperatures and studied the earth's atmosphere since the 1970s. The advocacy role he has undertaken has placed him squarely in the uncomfortable role of serving as lightening rod in the debate. He is respected among his peers for his creativity, his intellectual rigor and flexibility, and his dogged pursuit of this pressing global problem. Dr. Hansen's critics, however, claim that his findings and computer models are uncertain, contradictory and prone to induce hysteria.

Easier to document, however, is that the 1990s proved to be the warmest decade in a millennium and in the process, changed many minds about the seriousness of global warming. Dr. Hansen continues to direct his research in ways that contribute both to the body of knowledge of climate systems and to the broader implications of public policy.

The deliberate, soft-spoken Dr. Hansen has also recognized the need and the potential for researchers to influence science education. In 1994, with Carolyn Harris, he founded the Institute on Climate and Planets at the Goddard Institute in collaboration with local public high schools and colleges. Teachers and selected inner-city students, many of them minorities, are given the opportunity to join research groups at the Institute during their summer vacations. After the summer program, they continue their work on the Internet. Inspired by this work, teachers have developed courses that have been offered to schools across the country, with some 20 high schools and colleges now partnering with the Institute. The idea to assist in the teaching of science in many high schools and colleges, to involve students who might otherwise not have access to these complex issues, and most important, to attract minority students into science as a career, has become a model for how research institutes may reach out to high school and undergraduate students.

Dr. James Hansen's work has thrust him into the center of a scientifically polarized and politically charged debate. It is to his credit that he has navigated these treacherous waters admirably and we are fortunate to have him pointing the way when scientific complexities and political ramifications provide such a challenge.

Note: This profile is excerpted from the commemorative brochure published at the time of the awards' presentation.


UPDATES SINCE RECEIVING THE HEINZ AWARD

December 2012 - James Hansen is awarded the $10,000 2012 Stephen Schneider Award for Climate Science Communication, given by Climate One, an initiative of the Commonwealth Club of San Francisco. - Yale Climate Connections

June 2010 - James Hansen was award the 2010 Sophie Prize for his reputation as an outstanding scientist who has combined his research with political activism based on personal conviction. The Sophie Prize is awarded to one or several persons, or an organisation, which has created awareness of alternatives to modern-day development and/or initiated such alternatives in a pioneering or particularly inventive manner. The Sophie Prize is an annual environment and sustainable development prize (US$ 100,000). - The Sophie Prize

June 2010 - James Hansen was one of two prominent climate scientists - one from Great Britain (Bob Watson) and one from the United States (Dr. Hansen) - chosen as the recipients of the 2010 Blue Planet Prize, an international environmental award which is considered to be Japan's equivalent of the Nobel Prize, with a monetary equivalent of over $550,000 for each awardee. - Environmental News Service

December 2009 - Climate scientist James Hansen's conviction that a climate catastrophe is looming prompted him, at the age of 68, to write his first book. The title, Storms of My Grandchildren, refers to the ferocity of extreme weather events that will greet the next generation if the unmitigated use of fossil fuels continues. - Nature

April 2009 - James Hansen, director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, and David Foster, executive director of the Blue Green Alliance, are the first recipients of the Peter A. A. Berle Environmental Integrity Award, established to recognize demonstrated courage and integrity in defense of the environment. - Audubon Society

August 2008 - James Hansen, internationally-known climate scientist, received a 29th Annual Common Wealth Award of Distinguished Service. This prestigious award recognizes individuals who advance and enrich society through their life's work. The Common Wealth Awards of Distinguished Service were first presented in 1979 by the Common Wealth Trust, which honors the legacy of the late philanthropist Ralph Hayes. - Common Wealth Trust

March 2006 - Hansen appears on a 60 Minutes special entitled "Rewriting the Science". The special reports that the ice flow into the Atlantic ocean "has nearly doubled over the last five years."  Hansen continues to speak out on global warming despite attempts by NASA's public affairs office to restrict his comments. - Greenwire

December 2003 - Hansen publishes a report paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Co-authored with NASA scientist Larissa Nazarenko, the paper assert that soot, mostly from diesel engines, "is causing as much as a quarter of all observed global warming" because it reduces "the ability of snow and ice to reflect sunlight." - Associated Press

September 2002 - Hansen leads a study at NASA's Goddard Institute for Space Studies which concluded that continued global warming will occur to the extent that "global temperature should rise by about 3 degrees Fahrenheit in the next 50 years." - Newsday

December 2001 - Hansen receives the Roger Revelle Medal for bringing "global change to the forefront" of current scientific research and concern - American Geophysical Union

Speech

3/5/2001 - Acceptance Speech

Thanks very much, Teresa. An Award named for John Heinz has special significance for me for reasons that I would like to explain. I seem fated to be known for my testimony to Congress in 1988 to Tim Wirth's committee, by the way. That was the year that global warming became popular. But, events of the next year stand out in my mind. One week in May of 1989, global warming was in the news almost every day. Beginning on Monday with a page one article in The New York Times, saying 'scientist says budget office altered his testimony,' and ending on Friday with an article 'U.S. in a shift ... seeks treaty on global warming.'

Understandably, some people in Washington felt that the issue was being pushed too fast, and indeed the scientific community was still trying to decide if global warming was real. I thought that I was in trouble, but behind the scenes, Senator Heinz called the President's Chief-of-Staff on my behalf, and he wrote a two page letter. It was a remarkable letter, showing his depth of understanding of the scientific problem, and also his interest in fair play.

Another characteristic of Senator Heinz was evident in a town meeting that he organized in Philadelphia. He wanted to hear all sides of the global warming story and to find a balanced approach. He was a strong environmentalist, but he also worked to improve the economy of Pennsylvania and the nation. He realized that these goals need not conflict. He was thoughtful, or, as a scientist, I like the word objective.

In the current issue of Audubon Magazine, I suggest that the President appoint a commission of scientists, businessmen, consumers, and environmentalists to recommend actions to slow global warming. We can take common sense steps to do that. Our industry and our technology hold the key. We should reduce air pollution including low level ozone and soot, improve energy efficiency, and develop renewable energy. Collateral benefits improve public health and reduce dependence on foreign energy sources justify the cost. This practical approach could gain bipartisan and international consensus for addressing climate change. It's the kind of approach that John Heinz would have advocated.

I want to thank, Teresa Heinz and the Foundation for this Award, which I hope will encourage other scientists to speak their minds. Also, my wife Anniek, and Erik, and Kiki, for their generosity in letting me spend so much of my time on my science. And Reto Ruedy and Makiko Sato and Andy Lacis and my other colleagues who deserve most of the credit for the scientific work that we've done together. And Carolyn Harris, who's here tonight someplace, who deserves the credit for our student and educator outreach program. Thanks.
James Hansen
James Hansen