Senator John Heinz

RELATED NEWS

  • Dean Kamen talks to the BBC about why he created a "robot superbowl" go >>
  • Paul Farmer interviewed about Rwanda's significant healthcare recovery over the last 20 years go >>
  • Geoffrey Canada to advise on New York's plan to spend $2 billion on school technology go >>
  • Jane Lubchenco returns to Oregon State University as Distinguished University Professor and Adviser in Marine Studies go >>
  • Leila Janah, Samasource and SamaUSA are profiled by BBC News go >>
  • Jonathan Foley is interviewed for Marketplace on NPR go >>
  • Jonathan Foley's Five Point Plan to Feed the World is the cover article for National Geographic go >>
  • James Balog awarded Duke University LEAF Award for fine arts contributions in the environment go >>
  • John Luther Adams is the 2014 recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for Music go >>
  • Richard Jackson pens article on healthy communities for the Idaho Statesman go >>
  • Mario Molina receives the Knight medal of the French Legion of Honor go >>
  • Dan Simpson, columnist at the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, writes Op-Ed on this year's Heinz Awards go >>
  • Salman Khan is named a Presidential Ambassador for Global Entrepreneurship go >>
  • Peter Matthiessen, renowned writer and naturalist, and 6th Heinz Award recipient for Arts and Humanities, dies at 86 go >>
  • Peter Matthiessen's extraordinary life is profiled in The New York Times Magazine go >>
  • Hugh Herr gives his 2014 TED talk including a dance finale by a survivor who lost her lower leg in the Boston Marathon bombing go >>
  • Ann Hamilton commisioned to create large-scale public art installation for Seattle’s new waterfront reconstruction project go >>
  • Leila Janah's SamaUSA is profiled at NationSwell.com go >>
  • Paul Famer interviewed by Ray Chambers at The Huffington Post about ending tuberculosis go >>
  • Hugh Herr and his lab help Boston Marathon victim to dance again at TED go >>
  • The new documentary about Cary Fowler's work, Seeds of Time, is profiled at Grist.org go >>
  • Mario Molina and other AAAS scientists sound the alarm on climate change go >>
  • William Thomas is interviewed by Next Avenue on his new book on aging: Second Wind go >>
  • Abraham Verghese interviewed by the El Paso's News Paper Tree go >>
  • Leila Janah profiled in the March issue of Chronicle of Philanthropy go >>
  • Jacques d'Amboise lends his expertise and teaching methods to ten educators from across the country go >>
  • Khan Academy to gain exclusive partnership with College Board to offer free test prep courses go >>
  • Seeds of Time, a documentary that follows Cary Fowler as he works to stock the Svalbard Global Seed Vault, debuts at SXSW go >>
  • Jonathan Foley and his work is profiled at MinnPost.com go >>
  • Millie Dresselhaus is one of two Heinz Awardees in 2014 class inducted into National Inventors Hall of Fame go >>
  • Ashok Gadgil is one of two Heinz Awardees in 2014 class inducted into National Inventors Hall of Fame go >>
  • Leroy Hood's Institute for Systems Biology to test P4 ideas with nine-month pilot study, the Hundred Person Wellness Project go >>
  • After 23 years Geoffrey Canada will step down as chief executive of the Harlem Children's Zone go >>
  • Al Gore reviews Elizabeth Kolbert's book, The Sixth Extinction, for The New York Times Sunday Book Review go >>
  • Janine Benyus talks with Tim Brown of IDEO as part of a new TED editorial series, â??Questions Worth Askingâ?? go >>
  • Paul Ehrlich to receive the 2014 Frontiers of Knowledge Award for Ecology and Conservation Biology from the BBVA Foundation go >>
  • Elizabeth Kolbert's newest book, The Sixth Extinction, is reviewed by The New York Times go >>
  • Mason Bates co-curates Chicago Symphony Orchestra's reimagined MusicNOW series go >>
  • Dee Boersma's work on Magellanic penguins is profiled on NPR go >>
  • Dee Boersma's 28 year study on the direct impact of climate change on Magellanic penguins is profiled in The New York Times go >>
  • The New York Times reviews "Jacques' Art Nest," a benefit performance for Jacques d'Amboise's National Dance Institute go >>
  • Christopher Field is the 2013 recipient of the 400,000 euro BBVA Frontiers of Knowledge Award in climate change go >>
  • Elizabeth Kolbert interviewed at newyorker.com on her writing on species extinction go >>
  • Freeman Hrabowski writes Op-Ed for The Baltimore Sun go >>
  • Hugh Herr's BiOM prosthetic and upcoming research is profiled in Boston magazine go >>
  • Robert Langer is one of six recipients of the 2013 Breakthrough Prize in Life Sciences go >>
  • Freeman Hrabowski is interviewed in The New York Times go >>
  • Millie Dresselhaus receives the 2013 Von Hippel Award from the Materials Research Society go >>
  • Richard Lugar receives the Presidential Medal of Freedom go >>
  • Hugh Herr is profiled in Men's Fitness magazine go >>
  • Paul Farmer and Melinda Gates are interviewed for Wired magazine go >>
  • Christopher Field to receive the 2013 Max Planck Research Prize go >>
  • Herbert Needleman's work to protect children from lead poisoning is profiled by Gerald Markowitz and David Rosner go >>
  • Aaron T. Beck receives the first ever Kennedy Community Mental Health Award go >>
  • Amory Lovins writes a piece on what the 1973 oil embargo can teach us today go >>
  • Jane Lubchenco co-authors piece calling on policymakers to plan for climate change go >>
  • Jane Lubchenco shares the 2013 Stroud Award for Freshwater Excellence go >>
  • George Hatsopoulos (with brother John) is profiled in The Boston Globe as an example of how age has little to do with entrepreneurship go >>
  • Marian Wright Edelman and Children's Defense Fund celebrate 40th anniversary go >>
  • Peter Matthiessen to put out a new novel, "In Paradise" go >>
  • Ruth Patrick, a pioneer in studying the health of freshwater rivers and streams, has died at the age of 105 go >>
  • Joseph Rogers to receive lifetime achievement award from the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration go >>
  • Ralph Cavanagh writes OpEd piece for The New York Times on energy consumption go >>
  • Nancy Rabalais and the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium profiled in The Scientist go >>
  • Karin Chenowith reflects on Freeman Hrabowski's early involvement in the civil rights movement go >>
  • James Goodby co-authors piece on recent agreement between North and South Korea go >>
  • Richard Jackson is elected to honorary membership in The American Institute of Architects go >>
  • Robert Moses featured on NPR's Morning Edition go >>
  • Terry Collins' TAML activators are one step closer to commercial use go >>
  • John Harbison’s "Gatsby" performed at Tanglewood in honor of his 75th birthday go >>
  • Hugh Herr is profiled in The Wall Street Journal's Weekend Interview go >>
  • Ralph Gomory writes On Manufacturing and Innovation for The Huffington Post go >>
  • Chris Field to share the Max Planck Research Prize for his research on climate change on ecosystems go >>
  • Boston Symphony Orchestra honors John Harbison with Mark M. Horblit "Merit Award" go >>
  • Jay Keasling's work on biofuels profiled on NPR's Morning Edition go >>
  • Ralph Gomory pens editorial in The Washington Post on the role of human nature in business go >>
  • Daniel Sperling receives the 2013 Blue Planet prize from the Asahi Glass Foundation go >>
  • Steve Wozniak interviewed in Ireland's Silicon Republic about innovation, the technology economy and Apple go >>
  • Leroy Hood guest blogs at The Wall Street Journal on what "Nonprofits Can Learn from Startups" go >>
  • Mary Good to head new center focused on data visualization at the University of Arkansas at Little Rock go >>
  • Janine Benyus to share the 2013 Gothenburg Award for Sustainable Development go >>
  • Mark di Suvero awarded gold medal for the arts by American Academy of Arts and Letters go >>
  • Mary Good and her career in chemistry is profiled in a short film by the Chemical Heritage Foundation go >>
  • Jay Keasling to receive 2013 George Washington Carver Award for innovation in industrial biotechnology go >>
  • Jay Keasling and his current work on artemisinin profiled in San Francisco Business Times go >>
  • Joint BioEnergy Institute, headed by Jay Keasling, to be renewed until 2018 go >>
  • The Nuclear Threat Initiative, with Sam Nunn and Richard Lugar, proposes new strategy to reduce conflict and to encourage security go >>
  • Robert Langer pens a piece for Project Syndicate on Going Against Conventional Wisdom go >>
  • Robert Langer is interviewed on NPR's Science Friday go >>
  • C. Everett Koop, former surgeon general, has died at age 96 go >>

The Heinz Awards

1999

Dean Kamen

Dean Kamen receives the Heinz Award in Technology, the Economy and Employment for a set of inventions that have advanced medical care worldwide and for his dedication to awakening America's next generation to the excitement of careers in science and technology.

Mr. Kamen has made significant contributions to medical technology, with inventions that range from drug pumps to innovative dialysis machines. But despite this work and the success it has brought him, Mr. Kamen has found time to create and nurture US FIRST (For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology), an enterprise committed to enhancing public respect for the fields of science and technology and inspiring the next generation to pursue them. Motivated by a deep belief in the power and importance of education, he has coaxed, cajoled, and inspired an extraordinary array of corporate, education and government leaders into joining him in this remarkable effort.

His crusade on behalf of science and technology began in 1984 when he created Science Enrichment Encounters, an interactive science learning center in Manchester, New Hampshire that is visited by 40,000 children each year. His idea was to help young people see science and technology as fun, exciting, accessible, and rewarding. This idea was the genesis for US FIRST, an organization that Mr. Kamen views as an opportunity to both teach children and to motivate them. He wants them to view engineers and scientists as role models and heroes.

Mr. Kamen is a brilliant inventor, an engineer, a physicist, and a walking encyclopedia of nearly all the physical and biological sciences. The president of DEKA Research and Development Corp. in New Hampshire, he holds more than 100 U.S. patents. While still an undergraduate, he invented the wearable infusion pump, a device that delivers precisely calibrated doses of intravenous medication while the patient goes about his daily business. Later, he developed the world's first portable insulin pump and a revolutionary new portable kidney dialysis machine, both of which have radically transformed the lives of thousands of patients around the world.

In a recent interview, Mr. Kamen expressed concerns that the world's most crucial problems - pollution, hunger, depletion of natural resources, destruction of the ozone layer and contamination of the seas - are not being properly addressed. World leaders rely on legislative and political remedies, he says, not technical solutions. Mr. Kamen believes that tomorrow's scientists and engineers will create those solutions, and he is dedicated to developing the young people who will be able to do just that.

Dean Kamen embodies the best attributes of the engineer devoted to human welfare. His vocation - inventing and developing innovative medical devices - and his avocation of inspiring young people to become excited about science and technology evoke his unbounded enthusiasm, energy, and faith in our future.

Note: This profile is excerpted from the commemorative brochure published at the time of the awards' presentation.


UPDATES SINCE RECEIVING THE HEINZ AWARD

April 2011 - Dean Kamen receives the first-ever Hunt Institute Visionary Award. "We are honoring Dean Kamen for his success, his vision and his support in training a new generation of engineers who are committed to meeting the challenges of the developing world," said Hunter Hunt. He and his wife, Stephanie, founded Southern Methodist University's Hunt Institute of Engineering and Humanity, which is devoted to solving problems faced by impoverished communities. - AOL News

November 2010
- The Franklin Institute's mission is to inspire an understanding of and passion for science and technology learning. Encouraging excellence and recognizing the far reaching impact of the laureates' achievements is one important way to preserve the legacy of Benjamin Franklin. The 2011 recipient of the Franklin Medal in Mechanical Engineering is Dean Kamen. - The Franklin Institute

October 2010
- ISA continues its tradition of honoring leaders throughout the automation industry by presenting the Automation Founders Circle awards. This year's recipient of the Honorary Member award is Dean Kamen, the highest honor bestowed by the Society. - InTech

October 2009
- Dean Kamen, a prolific inventor holding more than 440 US and foreign patents, and whose groundbreaking ideas have transformed the way people take their medications, move about in daily life, and hope one day to produce energy and clean water, is this year's recipient of the Stevens Honor Award. First bestowed in 1945, the award was designed to honor notable achievement in any field of endeavor. Kamen joins a long and diverse list of distinguished recipients, including artist Alexander Calder, and futurist and inventor R. Buckminster Fuller. - Stevens News Service

October 2007
- DEKA Research and Dean Kamen have produced a prototype prosthetic arm that can lift up to 40 pounds and will enable an amputee with only minimal control to perform tasks ranging from eating M&Ms one at a time to using a portable power drill. It is still 15 to 18 months away from the commercial market, but the progress that Mr. Kamen has been able to make was on display this month in Anaheim, Calif., at DARPAtech 2007. - The New York Times

October 2006 - Sundance Channel and Grey Goose Entertainment will air the second season of their original television series, Iconoclasts. Each hour-long program features two leading innovators from different fields who come together to discuss their passions and creative processes. Dean Kamen, inventor and entrepreneur is paired with the actress, Isabella Rossellini. - PR Newswire

January 2005
- Kamen receives an honorary membership from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers "for innovating numerous medical devices, thereby improving the quality of life for many." - Institute of Electrical and Electronics

December 2004 - Kamen is the 2004 recipient of the Harold Berger Award which goes to individuals whose technological innovation has significantly changed lives. Kamen receives this honor for inventing several devices and machines that have alleviated some of the difficulties in the lives of invalids and diabetics. - Penn Engineering News

November 2003 - Kamen shops his latest invention around the world to get a feel for its potential popularity. The invention is a closed system water purifier, one that is "powered by what fuel is at hand, that traps the energy released when the boiled water vapor recondenses," and thus essentially recycles heat. The device will only cost about $1,000 and will make 10 gallons of drinkable water every hour, thus addressing the serious global issue of water contamination deaths. - Time

October 2003 - Kamen's latest invention, the iBot wheelchair, is approved for use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The chair, which climbs stairs, will require an actual doctor's prescription and training before it can be used. - Appliance Manufacturer

April 2003 - Kamen receives a Common Wealth Award for Distinguished Service from the PNC Financial Services Group. The awards go to individuals "who have enriched and advanced humanity through their exceptional lifetime achievements", and specifically to Kamen for his "breakthrough medical and transportation devices."

December 2002 - Kamen's latest invention, an electric scooter that he calls the Segway Human Transporter, is now available to the public. So far it has been picked up primarily by law enforcement officers and college security forces as it "is faster than a running human being," and is helpful for "interacting with the community and remaining visible" in addition to catching criminals. - TheTelegram & Gazette

November 2002 - Kamen is honored by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers "for his development of innovative technologies" and for creating and directing the For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology (FIRST) program, which hosts learning oriented competitions and which encourages student achievement in the fields of science and technology. His contributions are honored specifically by the ASME with the Ralph Coats Roe Medal. - The Union Leader

April 2002 - Kamen is honored with the Lemelson-MIT prize for inventors. He receives the $500,000 prize for his "development of the self-balancing scooter and of an infusion pump that has allowed diabetics to lead more normal lives." - Lemelson-MIT

April 2001 - Kamen wins the Presidential Medal from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, the school from which he holds an honorary degree. The award "recognizes individuals who exemplify the idea of the 'technological humanist,'" and Kamen receives it for his "extraordinary technical prowess" and myriad life changing inventions. - M2 Presswire

December 2000 - Kamen wins the National Medal of Technology for years worth of life changing inventions and for his tireless campaigns to involve America's youth in the realm of science and technology. The award is the nation's highest technological honor. - New Hampshire Sunday News

Dean Kamen
Dean Kamen