Senator John Heinz

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The Heinz Awards

1995

Andrew Grove

Andrew Grove receives the Heinz Award in Technology, the Economy and Employment in recognition of his astounding technological and business accomplishments, and his equally remarkable determination and vision. In a story as old as America, those traits transformed him from a young immigrant into a leading figure in the birth of the information society.

His accomplishments range from the technical to the commercial, from contributing to the development of the microprocessor chip - perhaps the most important advancement in the history of computing - to helping create the personal computer industry. As more Americans start traveling down the information highway, at speeds and prices to their liking, a tip of their symbolic hats to Andy Grove would be in order.

More than an engineering genius, he is an enlightened corporate executive and employer whose ability to nurture talent is legendary. His peers, as well as his employees, call him Andy, and that speaks volumes about the man's character, his approach to business and, most certainly, his approach to life.

A native of Hungary, Andrew Grove fled during the 1956 Soviet invasion. When he arrived in New York, he was 20 years old, had only a few dollars in his pocket, and knew even fewer words of English.

That boy from Budapest has lived the quintessential American success story. By working any job he could find, he put himself through New York's City College, earning a B.S. in Chemical Engineering, eventually receiving his masters and Ph.D. from the University of California at Berkeley.

Andrew Grove has played perhaps the single most pivotal role in the development and popularization of the 20th Century's most remarkable innovation - the personal computer. The technologies pioneered by Grove and his associates, first at Fairchild Semiconductor and then at Intel - the company he co-founded in 1968 - made the entire personal computing revolution possible. The world has barely begun to scratch the surface of the technological and economic benefits that revolution can bring.

No stranger to controversy, Mr. Grove has shown an ability to learn from experience. And, while others panicked over problems or setbacks, he has always managed to maintain his focus on what he does best: developing even faster, more affordable and more powerful technology.

Thanks in large measure to Andrew Grove's genius and vision, millions of people now have instant and inexpensive access to the kinds of information and entertainment about which even the privileged of earlier generations could only dream.

Note: This profile is excerpted from the commemorative brochure published at the time of the awards' presentation.


UPDATES SINCE RECEIVING THE HEINZ AWARD

May 2009 - To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the integrated circuit, the National Inventors Hall of Fame is honoring Andrew Grove with a lifetime achievement award. - San Jose-Mercury News

May 2005 - Grove retires from Intel after 37 years at the company. While he will step down as chairman of the Intel board, he plans on remaining with the company as a senior advisor. - Business Wire

February 2004 - Grove is honored with the Ernest C. Arbuckle Award from the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University for a lifetime of contributions to the business world. - Stanford University Graduate School of Business

January 2004 - Grove is #1 on the Wharton School and Nightly Business Report's "25 Most Influential Business Persons of the Past 25 Years" list. The honor goes to Grove for being "a visionary, unconventional leader who excels at turning setbacks into strength." - Business Wire

November 2002 - Grove releases his newest book, Swimming Across: A Memoir. The autobiographical piece documents his childhood immigration struggles and his rise to the top of the American economic plateau.

January 2000 - Grove receives the 2000 Medal of Honor award from the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers "for pioneering research in characterizing and modeling metal oxide semiconductor devices and technology, and leadership in the development of the modern semiconductor industry." - Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers

March 1999 - Grove releases his latest book entitled Only the Paranoid Survive: How to Exploit the Crisis Points That Challenge Every Company. The book offers advice to business owners on how to cope with a changing economy and myriad issues of business management, all of which are based on Grove's personal experience as director of Intel.

March 1998 - Grove steps down as CEO of Intel and is succeeded by Craig Barrett. Grove will stay on as the chairman of the Intel board "concentrating on the company's strategic direction." - The San Francisco Examiner

December 1997 - Grove is named Time magazine's "Man of the Year" for all of the exceptional progress and the countless contributions he has made despite a life of hardships. - Time

Andrew Grove